Q

Anonymous asked:

I'm intuitively aware that saying "I'm losing my mind" (and variations thereupon) is ableist, but I was wondering who can reclaim it. I have GAD, PTSD and depression, and when I'm feeling particularly dissociative or irrationally panicked, I say that because it's genuinely how I feel. I don't want to appropriate it if I don't have the right disorders to use it, though.

A

You’re fine to reclaim it. Don’t worry! -MO

"The Deaf believe there is nothing wrong… The hearing believe something needs to be fixed…"

"The problem is not that the students do not hear. The problem is that the hearing  world does not listen."

— Rev. Jesse Jackson (via signlanguagespokenhere)

(via mixedmetaphors)

youneedacat:

realsocialskills:

Content warning: This post is about sentiments leading to murder of people with disabilities. Proceed with caution.

At an autism conference recently, I heard the father of a 20 year old autistic man say in his speech to the whole conference, “I hope to…

Another interpretation of this is that the parent hopes their child doesn’t have to experience mourning their parent’s death. They could be completely oblivious to what that implies. -MO

“The radical disability model says there is nothing wrong with any of us.

We argue that disability is simply defined as those who are externally identified as disabled and those who self-identify as disabled.

To us, disability is not a point of individual or social tragedy but a natural and necessary part of human diversity. The tragedy of disability is not our minds and bodies but oppression, exclusion and marginalization.”
— If I Can’t Dance is it Still My Revolution? (via postcutearchives)

Q

Anonymous asked:

what do you think of the song Cripples Can't Shiver by Pianos Become the Teeth? it's about one of the member's father who had multiple sclerosis, but do you think the title is appropriate?

A

No, it’s not appropriate. Unless someone is talking about a firsthand personal experience of reclaiming the slur “cripple”, then it is not appropriate. -MO

Q

infernalteuthis asked:

irt the slideshow bout selective mutism, its says its not the result of trauma/abuse nor autism, but could it also be that? if someone is selectively mute as a result of abuse or it's part of them being autistic (am i even wording that okay?), wouldnt this kind of being throwing them under the bus? i see this a lot in the ace community (the "not because of abuse," that kind of thing) and it rings sort of off to me in this context too (i'm nt, tho, so ??)

A

Let me put on my psychology researching hat to answer this…

I want to preface this response by saying that I knew little about selective mutism until I did research on it. So please take what I say with a grain of salt. Also, it’s important to mention that clinical diagnostics and research are all I can comment on, as I have not heard secondhand any personal experiences with selective mutism. It would be great if those were involved here too.

For a quick background, I went to Wikipedia. I will bold the parts relevant to your question.

According to a more recent systematic study it is believed that children who have selective mutism are not more likely than other children to have a history of early trauma or stressful life events.[19] Another recent study by Dummit et al., in 1997 did not find any evidence of trauma in their sample of children. Recent evidence has shown that trauma doesn’t explain why most children with selective mutism develop the condition.[20] Many children who have Selective Mutism almost always speak confidently in some situations. Children who have experienced trauma however are known to suddenly stop speaking.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), first published in 1952, first included elective mutism in its third edition, published in 1980. Elective mutism was described as “a continuous refusal to speak in almost all social situations” despite normal ability to speak. While “excessive shyness” and other anxiety-related traits were listed as associated features, predisposing factors included “maternal overprotection”, mental retardation, and trauma. Elective mutism in the third edition revised (DSM III-R) is described similarly to the third edition except for specifying that the disorder is not related to social phobia.

In 1994, Sue Newman, co-founder of the Selective Mutism Foundation, requested that the fourth edition of the DSM reflect the name change from elective mutism to selective mutism and describe the disorder as a failure to speak. The relation to anxiety disorders was emphasized, particularly in the revised version (DSM IV-TR). 

Maya Angelou’s breakout award winning memoir “I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings”, chronicles her mutism following repeated rapes at age eight by her mother’s boyfriend. After the trial he was murdered and Ms. Angelou fell silent for years feeling responsible.

Adoption Detective by Judith Land mentions selective mutism, extreme shyness, and other social anxiety disorders as evidence of trauma frequently associated with adoption. She explains that adoptees with selective mutism have difficulty verbalizing personal thoughts that are excessively revealing and painful or of a subconscious nature; selective mutism can be highly functional for a child by reducing anxiety and protecting the child from perceived challenges of social interaction.

So it seems like trauma can be a prerequisite to selective mutism, but most children with selective mutism have not experienced trauma.

I pulled out my DSM-IV-TR to look at the entry for Selective Mutism (313.23). It mentions psychosocial stressors being associated with selective mutism. Psychosocial stressors can be any number of things, including abuse and trauma.

Associated features of Selective Mutism may include excessive shyness, fear of social embarrassment, social isolation and withdrawal, clinging, compulsive traits, negativism, temper tantrums, or controlling or oppositional behavior, particularly at home. There may be severe impairment in social and school functioning. Teasing or scapegoating by peers is common. Mental Retardation, hospitalization, or extreme psychosocial stressors may be associated with the disorder. In addition, in clinical settings, children with Selective Mutism are almost always given an additional diagnosis of an Anxiety Disorder (especially Social Phobia).

As for autism, the DSM doesn’t mention it specifically in relation to selective mutism. However, it does say that if the mutism occurs “exclusively during the course of a Pervasive Developmental Disorder” then that diagnosis will be given and Selective Mutism will be abandoned as a diagnostic option. In this version of the DSM, Autism Disorder is considered a Pervasive Developmental Disorder.

The Wikipedia article mentions autism, specifically. I take Wikipedia with a grain of salt, always (and this section doesn’t have a citation):

Particularly in young children, SM can sometimes be confused with an autism spectrum disorder, especially if the child acts particularly withdrawn around their diagnostician, which can lead to incorrect treatment. Although autistic people may also be selectively mute, they display other behaviors—hand flapping, repetitive behaviors, social isolation even among family members (not always answering to name, for example)—that set them apart from a child with selective mutism. Some autistic people may be selectively mute due to anxiety in social situations that they do not fully understand. If mutism is entirely due to autism spectrum disorder, it cannot be diagnosed as selective mutism.

Sooooo TL;DR - I don’t know why the OP said selective mutism cannot be caused by trauma or abuse, but it’s clear that it is not caused by autism.

Thanks for the ask! -MO

vinegardoppio:

pitbulled:

impactings:

Hey tumblr! Did you know that if you suffer from depression / anxiety or any other mental illness, you can register your dog as an emotional support animal, making it illegal for a landlord to refuse to rent to you? That’s right. No breed restrictions, no weight restrictions, no matter what, they are not allowed to refuse.

This includes cats, rabbits, birds, guinea pigs, etc.!! Go here to register your pet as an ESA :~) 

This is a scam.

The website linked (and many others) will sell you fake IDs in for a fee and it literally doesn’t qualify you for anything. Unfortunately, (at least in the United States) emotional support/therapy animals do not qualify as service animals.  This means you can very well be legally rejected by a landlord, public transportation service, etc. 

Please read this and stop spreading false information that will scam people out of their money. Taking advantage of people with mental issues is one of the most disgusting things you can do.

(via meajoraswrath)

Q

plasticvines asked:

This is for that follower asking about Vyvance. Everyone's body chemistry is different, so I think it's really important not to judge medication on how someone else is doing on it. Just make sure you talk to your doctor about everything. Sometimes you have to switch meds a couple times until you find the right one that works for you.

A

Exactly -MO

theselectivemutismblog:

What Is Selective Mutism?
theselectivemutismblog:

What Is Selective Mutism?
theselectivemutismblog:

What Is Selective Mutism?
theselectivemutismblog:

What Is Selective Mutism?
theselectivemutismblog:

What Is Selective Mutism?
theselectivemutismblog:

What Is Selective Mutism?
theselectivemutismblog:

What Is Selective Mutism?
theselectivemutismblog:

What Is Selective Mutism?

Q

ajaegerpilot asked:

hi there. i'm wondering if saying 'this is so sick' in response to something really horrifying like an injust war ableist? it probably is, but no one's ever said so i'm probably going to stop saying it either way but it'd probably be best to ask actual disabled people their opinions on the matter.

A

karalianne:

isthisableism:

For me personally, it makes me a little uncomfortable, but it kind of makes sense to me at the same time? I might be having some internalized ableism going on in relation to “this is so sick”. I can’t speak for all disabled people. Any followers have input on how you feel about it? -MO

I usually think of it as being short for “this is so sickening” in which case it isn’t ableist at all and is instead saying that it is so horrible that it makes you feel sick/like you’re going to vomit/etc.

That makes more sense to me than what I initially think of when I hear “that’s sick”. It’s something to the tune of “that’s something a severely mentally ill person would do or support.” Different perspectives! -MO