Q

Anonymous asked:

(tw murder, 1/2) I had this one really abusive casual teacher but he never touched me so the teachers didn't believe it was really abuse but I was so scared of him that if I would have a panic attacks. One time that happened and my regular teacher yelled at me for having a "tantrum", then made me go to the office and the office ladies asked me why I was upset. I said I was mad and wanted to kill that teacher. Then I got suspended and the principal said I can't come back until I got treated for

A

(2/2) being mentally ill cause he thought I was mentally ill and that’s why I was violent. Despite other class members admitting they witnessed the abuse, the principal said that because I was mentally ill I was unreliable and I made the entire thing up. Just so you know, I was 11. I get that making death threats is wrong, but I was 11, did he really think I could kill a teacher? Was he ableist?

This is a tricky area. Principals have to take care of the safety of all students, teachers, and staff in their schools. Regardless of the reason why, a death threat happened. They should have handled it better, but it’s not unreasonable to give you time away from school until they can assess your level of dangerousness. Even though you were only 11, there have been kids much younger that have shot up schools or killed people. It’s possible.

As for the abusive teacher, he should have been dealt with appropriately. It should not have gotten to the point where you were that scared of him. He should have been reprimanded, taught how to treat children correctly, and perhaps been put on suspension while he did this.

The principal should not have said that because you had a mental illness you were unreliable and were making it up. Even if he suspected that were true, he should not have said it! Yes, it is ableist that he said that.

Let me share a personal experience of mine that is sort of related. I was in highschool seeing a therapist outside of school. I had seen her for over a year, and I had suffered through a lot of abuse, neglect, and loss. I had PTSD, panic attacks, bipolar disorder I, ADHD, and some other stuff that wasn’t actually diagnosed until I was an adult. Because of the abuse, I also had severe rage that resulted in homicidal ideations. I never would have killed someone, but I still thought these things. I shared them freely with my therapist so that I could work through how I felt, instead of acting it out.

Once I told her that I sometimes had the homicidal thoughts in school. She had me promise her that if I ever had them in school, that I should go to the guidance counselor and tell her. One day, someone was treating my friend really badly in the hallway. I asked him to stop, but he ignored me and berated both of us. I went to the guidance counselor and told her I was really upset and wanted to kill him. I made it clear I wouldn’t do it, but that I felt it. I was suspended.

They suspended me until school officials talked to my therapist, who told them that I was not a threat and I did what I had promised her I would do. They let me back in school with no issues. I was confused that I was suspended for doing what I thought was right, but they didn’t know about the agreement with my therapist, and they were understandably taking precautions.

So while it wasn’t the best outcome for you, it was probably the safest outcome for the school until they figured out exactly what was going on.

An aside, it doesn’t matter what causes psychiatric symptoms like anxiety, intense fear, and panic attacks. A psychiatrist or mental health professional would still consider it a “mental illness.” I feel it’s pretty messed up, because abuse survivors are seen as unreliable and “cr*zy” while the abuser is often left alone to live their seemingly “normal” life. 

-MO

lipstick-autistic:

Just because someone’s comfortable talking to you about their autism doesn’t mean they’re comfortable talking to everyone about it.

Don’t out autistic people without their consent.

(via icantlookupautism)

bleed-in-ink:

people who make fun of trigger warnings are fucking horrifying.

It’s like, here’s someone who’s gone through something absolutely fucking horrible—let’s stay war, or rape, or violence, or abuse, or molestation, or something you cannot fucking imagine—and they just don’t want to experience it…

Q

Anonymous asked:

someone with selective mutism isn't completely mute, though? only in certain situations... idk I think that anon might've meant someone who was completely mute all the time? is there something like that?

A

Oh. Yea, there is. -MO

Q

Anonymous asked:

Is it possible for someone to be completely mute in the speaking sense in a way not caused by deafness, like, I've read a couple of portal fanfictions that said this about Chell but I'm not quite sure if that's correct

A

Yes. I was actually talking on here about selective mutism a few days ago. -MO

Q

Anonymous asked:

Is writing someone with multiplicity who has a serial killer headmate ableist? I'm doing a lot of research and I'm planning to talk to plural systems with DID to make sure I don't write anything offensive, but I was wondering if making a headmate a violent psychopath offensive? I'm worried, since there are already so many negative portrayals of people with mental illnesses, that I'll come off as implying that all plural systems have violent headmates/are violent.

A

grumpy-poo:

isthisableism:

I don’t necessarily think it’s ableist, but it can be offensive and is definitely a disability trope that should be avoided, for the reason you mention (perpetuating negative stereotypes and portrayals of people with mental health concerns). -MO

Speaking as someone who actually has the disorder, yes, what you are doing is absolutely 100% ableist, no gray areas, no exceptions, jfc.

Your input is more important than mine since I do not have DID. Thank you. I change my opinion on it. (I wasn’t sure to begin with) -MO

Q

Anonymous asked:

In a story i'm writing my main character is paralyzed. However, I am able bodied, and therefore have no idea how to write characters with paralysis. I want to include real problems in my stories (example: having characters be casually ableist towards him, such as directing all questions to his younger brother, whom he is the guardian and caretaker for) Would this be inappropriate? and if not, could you give me some everyday issues that could arise? I really don't know where to look for answers.

A

Honestly I am wondering why you are writing a character with paralysis if you have no idea how to, or what people with paralysis experience daily. Being ill-informed and writing about paralysis is probably not the best idea, as you might be unintentionally ableist or offensive. If you really want to move forward with the character, I suggest researching and researching and researching. Speaking directly with people that experience paralysis and/or reading/listening to their experiences firsthand is something I highly recommend. -MO

Q

Anonymous asked:

I am able bodied but I prefer to use the larger accessibility stall in bathrooms in some situations. Sometimes they are more private if there is a large gap between the stall door and stall frame. Sometimes they are the only bathroom that has a sanitary place for me to put my purse. Also they're usually at the back of the bathroom, goes back to privacy. I don't really see a problem in this seeing as I have never prevented a disabled person from using the bathroom. Is this wrong of me?

A

You might not have known that you prevented a disabled person from using the restroom. Not all physical disabilities are visible. Needing a sanitary place to put your purse is not a valid reason to potentially prevent someone from using the only bathroom stall that they can access. You can hold your purse in your hand off the floor, or hang it on the peg that is on the back of most bathroom stall doors. -MO

Q

Anonymous asked:

Is writing someone with multiplicity who has a serial killer headmate ableist? I'm doing a lot of research and I'm planning to talk to plural systems with DID to make sure I don't write anything offensive, but I was wondering if making a headmate a violent psychopath offensive? I'm worried, since there are already so many negative portrayals of people with mental illnesses, that I'll come off as implying that all plural systems have violent headmates/are violent.

A

I don’t necessarily think it’s ableist, but it can be offensive and is definitely a disability trope that should be avoided, for the reason you mention (perpetuating negative stereotypes and portrayals of people with mental health concerns). -MO

Q

dotthepenguin asked:

I find it really satisfying to call this certain person a "weenie baby" because I'm get thoroughly angered by this person. Is the term "weenie baby" albeist?

A

I don’t know. On the surface it’s definitely ageism. Only you can know why you call them this and what you hope to get out of it. If it is because you equate babies with being somehow mentally, emotionally, or cognitively incompetent, then it’s both ableist and ageist. Hope that helps. -MO