Things able-bodied people need to stop saying to the chronically ill.

diaryofaspoonie:

• “At least you’re not dying!”
• “You’re only disabled if you let yourself be.”
• “You need to tell yourself you’re going to get better, else you won’t.”
• “But you can’t be in pain ALL the time, don’t exaggerate.”
• “You don’t LOOK ill.”
• “There’s so many people worse off than you.”
• “I’m sure you don’t REALLY need help.”
• “Sometimes it’s easier to just give up.”
• “Stop being so negative.”

(via fyeahcracker)

livingwithdisability:

Anti epilepsy pillows are pillows that you can breathe through in case of a seizure. 
They save lives and are provide free by UK charity "Epilepsy Sucks UK"
Quote from the Charity website:
"THIS IS WHY WE DO WHAT WE DO
'Death from suffocation can result within minutes when a child or adult suffering a seizure becomes entrapped in an ordinary pillow which blocks their nose and mouth. If saved from death, oxygen starvation and brain injury may occur resulting in lifelong disability and dependency'.
Solution: Anti-suffocation pillow!
'Among 15 cases of Sudden Unexpected Deaths in Epilepsy that were witnessed in the community, difficulty breathing was observed in 80% of these cases, where 70% of patients were found in a prone position, suggesting that suffocation contributed to their deaths'.
Solution: Anti-Suffocation pillow!
'Frequent arousals caused by epileptic activity are one possible basis for insomnia. Depression or anxiety, which are common in epilepsy patients, also may contribute'.(Lack of sleep is a well documented seizure triggering factor)
Solution: Reduce anxiety, fear and possible seizures with an anti-suffocation pillow!
'The main health risks come from the worry, lack of sleep and depression that caring can bring. Carers often have to fight and battle for the support they get and this wears you down. All this can lead to high blood pressure and stress-related illness'
Solution: Parents and carers have reported to us that they have slept better since receiving an anti-suffocation pillow!”
The charity are very near to winning a £5000 donation. It is an online vote with a login from fb, google + or twitter.
There are a small grass roots charity of volunteers and this would make a big difference to them
Please VOTE if you can here
https://www.directdebit.co.uk/DirectDebitPromotions/BigBreak2014/Pages/CauseDetail.aspx?CauseId=260


Would this still work if you were face down? The holes would be smashed into the bed with your face and you wouldn’t be able to breathe through them..? -MO

livingwithdisability:

Anti epilepsy pillows are pillows that you can breathe through in case of a seizure. 

They save lives and are provide free by UK charity "Epilepsy Sucks UK"

Quote from the Charity website:

"THIS IS WHY WE DO WHAT WE DO

'Death from suffocation can result within minutes when a child or adult suffering a seizure becomes entrapped in an ordinary pillow which blocks their nose and mouth. If saved from death, oxygen starvation and brain injury may occur resulting in lifelong disability and dependency'.

Solution: Anti-suffocation pillow!

'Among 15 cases of Sudden Unexpected Deaths in Epilepsy that were witnessed in the community, difficulty breathing was observed in 80% of these cases, where 70% of patients were found in a prone position, suggesting that suffocation contributed to their deaths'.

Solution: Anti-Suffocation pillow!

'Frequent arousals caused by epileptic activity are one possible basis for insomnia. Depression or anxiety, which are common in epilepsy patients, also may contribute'.
(Lack of sleep is a well documented seizure triggering factor)

Solution: Reduce anxiety, fear and possible seizures with an anti-suffocation pillow!

'The main health risks come from the worry, lack of sleep and depression that caring can bring. Carers often have to fight and battle for the support they get and this wears you down. All this can lead to high blood pressure and stress-related illness'

Solution: Parents and carers have reported to us that they have slept better since receiving an anti-suffocation pillow!”

The charity are very near to winning a £5000 donation. It is an online vote with a login from fb, google + or twitter.

There are a small grass roots charity of volunteers and this would make a big difference to them

Please VOTE if you can here

https://www.directdebit.co.uk/DirectDebitPromotions/BigBreak2014/Pages/CauseDetail.aspx?CauseId=260

Would this still work if you were face down? The holes would be smashed into the bed with your face and you wouldn’t be able to breathe through them..? -MO

(via thespoontheory)

Q

Anonymous asked:

is it ableist to say that a current theory is "deformed"? (a theory you are against)

A

builtlikeacoelacanth:

isthisableism:

That’s some really weird wording in referring to a theory. It could be interpreted as ableist. I’d choose a word that is more explanatory and clear than that. -MO

how bout distorted?

Distorted would be fine. -MO

Q

Anonymous asked:

is it ableist to say that a current theory is "deformed"? (a theory you are against)

A

That’s some really weird wording in referring to a theory. It could be interpreted as ableist. I’d choose a word that is more explanatory and clear than that. -MO

Q

Anonymous asked:

I'm anon that recovered from depression and was going to speak at the event. The event is a school project that raises awareness about mental disorders and where to seek treatments and how. It turns out that I'm not actually sharing my experiences, but telling people information. Another person who is depressed is sharing his experiences, and information on whether depression is diversity or pathology, why acceptance is necessary in preventing suicide and in recovery, so everything is fine.

A

.

flutterflyinvasion:

andreashettle:

justrollinon:

I’d love it if they stopped using the phrase “despite their disabilities”

image

Oh, gosh, I would love this too.

Ever notice that 99 percent of the time someone uses the phrase “despite their disabilities, they’re talking about something that isn’t even…

yup

The Myth of Slacktivism

wolferfly:

The Myth of Slacktivism

A ‘slacktivist’ is someone who chooses to do all or most of their activist work through online mediums such as Twitter, Facebook, Timblr, and so on. These people are often disregarded as lesser and lazy activists when compared to those who are able to do activism work offline. For example, UrbanDictionary.com defines slacktivism as, “The act of participating in obviously pointless activities as…

View On WordPress

(via thespoontheory)

Q

sugarplummegan asked:

The same thing happened to me a few years ago as the anon with the leg issues/walking issues. I was lucky enough to be able to see a doctor, a chiropractor, and a sorts trainer about it and no one was able to help. I came up with some of my own therapies for it if your anon would like some ideas! My ask box is open!

A

There you go, anon! -MO

Q

Anonymous asked:

So I'm not totally sure what the cause of the problem is, but my legs hurt almost all the time, and it's worse if I walk for more than about 5 minutes. My mum keeps getting pissed off about this. Is this ableist? She keeps telling I'm too young to have all these physical problems.

A

That’s really problematic on her part. Sorry your mom is being dismissive of your concerns. You should probably see a doctor about that if you are able. -MO

Q

Anonymous asked:

So uhh I used to have depression but I've recovered now but I've been asked to go to an event where people with depression share their experiences. However I have recovered so would it be ableist for me as a neurotypical person to speak at this event?

A

Not if you talked about your experience with depression…that you used to have. I think it is somewhat problematic to me personally for this dynamic to happen sometimes because it gives the idea to some people that you aren’t okay the way you are, that you need to be fixed, and that your depression is unacceptable. Like the “look at this recovered person you can do it too!” dynamic. If I were you I would talk to the organizers of the event and ask what their intentions are with asking you to speak, and let them know explicitly that you no longer experience depression. That would be a great start. -MO